Beagle Terrier

 

All About The Beagle Terrier

 

Also called the English Beagle or Boglen Terrier, the Beagle Terrier is a sturdy built dog; quite muscular for its small size. This mixed breed has those big hazel puppy dog eyes with a pleading expression capable of filling its owner’s heart with compassion. They are smart, quick and very active. As a matter of fact, the more they do the happier they are.

 

The Beagle Terrier is a cross between the Boston Terrier and the Beagle and are said to be quick learners. The breed was originally developed for hunting and inherits traits from each parent breed making it not only a good hunter but a good house pet as well. There are two size varieties of this dog, though both are under 15 inches keeping it in the category of a fairly small breed.

 

Though the look of the Beagle Terrier leans more toward that of the Boston Terrier with the square face and pointed ears, they can also be seen sporting the longer dangling ears of the Beagle. Their coats are short and dense and do not require a lot of attention outside of brushing. Their color and patterns can follow those of either parent breed.

 

Even though the Beagle Terrier inherits a lot from the terrier side it gets its friendly, playful disposition (especially with children) from the Beagle side of the family. They tend to love to play, lick when excited, snuggle as if they were a lap dog and do not have a tendency to be barkers. They love activity like running along side a bike, playing Frisbee, and just generally joining ‘in the chase’.

 

 

The Beagle Terrier is fairly receptive to extensive training, but needs to have an eye kept on them. Bred to be pack animals (they quickly make their family part of theirs) they do make a fairly good watch dog in the sense that they will alert you to company and not necessarily impending danger. They are neither territorial nor protective. This, mixed with their natural curiosity could mean they will be just as playful with strangers as they are with the family.

 

In order to bring out the best of both parent breed characteristics the Beagle Terrier should be trained in the areas he is expected to perform in, and can be taught when to be social as well as when not to be. They do have a keen sense of smell, though and this often proves to be a negative point as they get sidetracked without second thought. In this respect they should not be trusted outdoors without proper training particularly as new additions to the family. Grooming is just part of keeping your pet in overall good health and the Beagle Terrier’s does not have to be extensive. They like the attention so a monthly bath and weekly brushing should keep them not only spruced up but happy. Do not forget to clip their toenails. They need a basic nutritionally balanced diet from the same groups as people-protein, as well as vegetation.